Skip to main content

Natural Awakenings SW PA, Greater Pittsburgh

Fecal Transplant Helps Caesarean Babies

Caesarean baby

Storyblocks.com

A downside of the rising number of caesarean (C-section) births is that it deprives babies of contact with bacteria from the mother’s gut microbiome, which impoverishes the baby’s own microbiome and raises the risk of allergies and obesity later in life, as studies show. Previously, researchers swabbed C-section babies’ mouths with vaginal bacteria, but it had no effect. In fact, the valuable gut bacteria are released in the mother’s fecal matter during the messy process of birth.

In a pilot study, doctors from the University of Helsinki tested 17 mothers that were about to need C-sections and chose seven that had fecal matter free of pathogens and antibiotics. After the babies were born, doctors used a syringe to feed the infants a tiny amount of the previously harvested fecal matter mixed with breast milk. The babies had no negative responses. Within three weeks, those babies’ gut flora came to resemble more strongly the gut flora of babies born vaginally than that of those born through C-sections.
Upcoming Events Near You
Digital Issue
#SupportLocal
Healthy Ways To Spend Time At Home
Global Brief: Natural Thinking Spending Time in Nature Increases Cognitive Performance
More of our time is spent indoors than ever before. One of the ways by which nature may improve cognitive function (i.e. the acquisition of and goal-oriented use of knowledge) is by improving memory formation and recall, specifically that of short-term or working memory, and goal-oriented or directed attention; the kind that requires focused effort. By comparing and contrasting 13 studies, a team of researchers has shed light on this complex interaction in research published in Frontiers in Psychology. The studies used the backwards digit span task, which requires participants to invert a series of numbers and repeat them back. All demonstrated significantly improved cognition in nature as compared to urban environments. The benefits of studies like this are two-fold: not only are we learning more about how the brain interacts with its environment, but also how to leverage this interaction to lead healthier, more productive and happier lives.
Like Us On Facebook!